Final Friday Events for September

21 09 2015

Final Fridays began in August of 2010 through the cooperation of the Lawrence Arts Center, Downtown Lawrence Inc., The Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission and a wealth of artists, gallerists, art collectives and local businesses—as all saw the value of the arts in our city and an opportunity to bring them to a wider public through this monthly free arts festival.

Lawrence has one of the highest  percentages of working artists in the country per capita, and has long stood out in the Kansas landscape as a mecca for creative thought and energy. On the last Friday of every month (all year long!) from 5 until 9 pm, the streets of Downtown Lawrence erupt, storefronts convert into flash spaces, and performances and exhibits spill in and out of galleries and businesses.  Activities for kids, exhibitions designed to challenge adults, music, dance and theater for all ages are all within walking distance of each other.

Events for September 25th, 2015

5:00 until 9:00 pm (unless otherwise noted)

CULINARIA FOOD AND WINE (512 East 9th Street)
http://www.culinariafoodandwine.com

Paintings by Emily Fernando, Food and Drinks by Culinaria

“Emily’s paintings of figures and objects are bold and emotional, with a hint of mystery in the atmosphere.”

Art will be shown throughout the month of October and can be purchased at Final Friday, September 25th, Wine Club on October 21st (with reservation), by appointment most Tues/Thurs from 12-4 pm, and at our Supper Club Specialty Dinner, October 23rd.

ESSENTIAL GOODS (825 Massachusetts St.)
www.facebook.com/essentialgoodslawrence

For our September Final Friday Artwalk, Essential Goods is excited to welcome artist Lawrence artist Susan McCarthy. Please join us at her opening reception on Friday, September 25th from 5 to 9 pm to meet the artist and view her new work!

Susan McCarthy is a long time resident of Lawrence. She received two Bachelor degrees from KU—one in Philosophy and one in Printmaking. In her fifties, she went back to school and obtained a Masters degree in Art History from Boston University. In addition to making art, an occupation for over thirty years, she now teaches as an adjunct at Washburn University and does research and writing about art history.

Artist Statement: I have worked in oil pastels for a long time. Some of the pieces in this show are night scenes but also included are a number of pieces based on quilting. I start with small sections cut from drawings I was ready to throw away. However in each “failed” work there were always small areas which were worth saving, just like small scraps of fabric which are salvageable although the garment itself is worn out. I looked at quilt patterns or famous quilters, like Harriet Powers, for inspiration. Susan’s work will be up through October 28th, 2015.

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL & BALSAMIC VINEGAR TASTING SHOP (937 Mass. St.)
http://www.extravirginoilsvinegars.com

“Harvest Songs”, Artwork by Kathleen Anderson, Laurie Culling, Leta Strom, Peggy Mohr. September 25, Final Friday, Reception 5-9pm. Show runs through October 27, 2015.

Kathleen Anderson is a Lawrence resident who has been painting in watercolor and oil for the past 14 years. She loves color in all its brilliance and subtleties with subject matter that includes landscapes, city scenes, seascapes, flowers and animals. She is a member of the Lawrence Art Guild, the Greater Kansas City Art Association, and the Missouri Valley Impressionist Society. Her work hangs in private and corporate collections and has been displayed in 1109 Gallery in Lawrence, SouthWind Gallery in Topeka, and Images Gallery, Buttonwood Gallery, and ARTichokes Gallery in the Kansas City area. http://www.kathleenhelenanderson.com, http://www.artkc.com/anderson_k.htm

Laurie Culling is a visual artist and active visual artists’ advocate, living in Lawrence. Ranging in style from realistic to abstract, her art explorations feature a variety of mediums including acrylic on canvas, mixed media on gypsum, monotypes, watercolor, pastels, hand-made paper collage, fabric and beads. Her artwork has been exhibited locally, regionally and nationally and she has received numerous awards including Lawrence’s prestigious Phoenix Award in Visual Arts (2002). Her works are in many private, public and corporate collections. Laurie is a former Lawrence Art Guild co-president and vice-president, the co-founder of the Phoenix Gallery (1982), a founding member of the F.A.N. Club (1987) and Artist for the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center (1988). Laurie volunteered as art exhibit coordinator on behalf of the Lawrence Art Guild for the Lawrence Public Library for 20 years. She was the volunteer Assistant Director of the Lawrence Art Guild ‘s 1109 GALLERY in Downtown Lawrence. http://www.laurieculling.com, http://www.convergenceart.com, http://www.lawrenceartguild.org

LETA STROM BACKDOOR PHOTOS During her travels with her husband Steve, Leta Strom utilized traditional and modern photographic techniques to create canvas pieces that capture the charm and distinctiveness of various locales in Italy, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Czech Republic, and Slovakia. Her photo company, “Backdoor Photo,” takes its name from the approach that Steve and Leta chose in planning their European adventure. Rather than visiting a great many large cities, they chose to enter the countries through the ‘backdoor,’ wandering along winding cobblestone streets, becoming lost in the centuries-old charm of the villages and falling in step with the daily lives of locals. It is Leta’s hope that as you view her photos, you may become lost in the enchanting appeal of these European spots. Leta Strom has been involved in the Arts and working with young people for over twenty-five years. She taught high school drama and students with spec ial needs. Leta resides in Lawrence, Kansas with her husband, Steve, and enjoys spending time with her daughters, Lauren and Kristin.

Peggy Mohr Though new to acrylic painting, Peggy has expressed her creativity in many ways since young. Music, dance and sewing were a major part of her growing up years, yet she always wanted to paint. She transferred to KU in 1975, graduated, married and raised her children in Lawrence, KS., where she currently resides with her husband, Larry. She worked for a local water color artist for many years yet never tried painting for herself. In 2008 she divinely came across a sketch she had done of her “brother’s mind” when she was in junior high, in Southern California. This was the kick she needed to pursue art for herself. After taking various classes at the art center she made the decision to focus on painting. For her, this had been a growing process, releasing a renewed love of the arts and gratefulness to God for His faithful “nudging”. http://peggymohr.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (946 Vermont St.) 6:00 to 9:00 P.M.
http://www.fumclawrence.org/ArtProgram

The Art Cafe is a free after school arts program for teenagers. This is the first time these young artists will show their work. Come celebrate their creativity and courage.

HENRY’S ON EIGHTH STREET (11 East 8th St.) 6:00 to 9:00 P.M.

Propagate || Works by Jerod Barker

Come join Henry’s this beautiful September to welcome the new works of local artist, Jerod Barker.
Opening: September 25th: 6-9 pm

Artist Bio: I am an illustrator and designer interested in mythology, forces of nature and the human perspective. Inspired by music and traditional printing methods, I try to grab attention and convey emotion with color and graphic detail. When I’m not making posters or patterns, I’m enjoying the outdoors, attending local events and traveling.

MANA BAR (1111 Massachusetts St.) 6:00 TO 9:00 P.M.

STONES AND PRINTS | environmental works by Samantha Otte and Paul Punzo

Paul Punzo has been making linoleum block prints for almost six years. Paul creates colorful prints of special objects in his everyday life: sacred hearts, hamsas, wrestlers and his cats. Through the use of hand printing and layering, he creates images of visual and emotional depth. All prints are hand pressed using inks, watercolors, acrylics and spray paint. Paul has shown at Essential Goods, Seed co, The Percolator and the Social Service League and various locations in Wichita and Kansas City. Samantha Otte is an artist and craftsperson living and working in Lawrence KS. Divinding her time between working at the co-op and her studio, Sam creates beautiful jewelry inspired by kind ethics and nature. Some of Sam’s favorite materials include metal, crystals, sari silk, suede, deerskin, and stones. https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaroonedMoonJewels

PERCOLATOR ART SPACE (913 Rhode Island) 6:30 to 10:00 P.M.
www.lcava.com

The Percolator Art Space is proud to present, “Contested Territories” by Norman Akers. This exhibition will be on display at the Percolator Art Space from September 25-October 24, 2015. Norman will give a gallery talk at 6:30 pm at the exhibit opening on September 25th.

This exhibition consists of 20 monoprints that explore issues related to an ever-changing political and cultural landscape in the Americas. The prints make use of layered imagery, including early European prints and altered maps to create an alternate landscape. Prof. Akers’ work addresses the impact of colonialism in the Americas exploring issues related to identity and place. The vocabulary of our time with words such as indigenous, native, outsider, illegal alien, and immigrant are used to define people’s relationship to place. The complexity of defining home, with the notion of belonging to or claiming a place in a shifting historic and political landscape has deeply influenced this body of work.

Prof. Akers is an Associate Professor in the Visual Arts Department at the University of Kansas. As an Osage artist, Prof. Akers reinvents what it means to be a cartographer through paintings and prints whose nonlinear map images range from names of states, roadway lines, tribal oral histories, and flora and fauna. These qualities converge to express both a personal and cultural exploration in reclaiming a sense of place and home.

“A few years ago, I began to explore other approaches to image making. The computer became a sketchbook where I developed digital images and collages. I began to use a variety of printing techniques including paper lithography and reduction printing. The use of gum arabic transfers from digital sketches and hand cut stencils allowed me to advance the layering process to achieve a new spatial and conceptual depth to the prints. The act of placing images on the printing paper echoes my desire to orient myself in the physical world. While painting allows images into my vocabulary at a contemplative pace, printmaking allows me to develop ideas quickly and to explore variations on new ideas,” Prof. Akers said.

Prof. Akers will give a gallery talk entitled, “Experiences of a Native Artist in the Mainstream” at the Percolator Art Space at 1 pm on Saturday October 17th. This talk focuses on issues related to identity, stereotyping, and expectations in the art market.

Prof. Akers has had solo exhibitions at institutions including the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, the Lawrence Arts Center, and the Carl Gorman Museum. He has been included in group exhibitions at the Katonah Museum of Art, Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others. His works are a part of permanent collections at the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM; National Museum of the American Indian, Washington DC; University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, NM; Rockwell Museum, Corning, NY; Eiteljorg Museum, Indianapolis, IN; Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ; Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK; Museum of Contemporary Native American Art, Santa Fe, NM; Art in the Embassies Program, US Department of State, Yerevan, Armenia; Gardiner Art Gallery, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK; Fine Arts Center, Eastern Wyoming College, Torrington, WY; and Southern Plains Indian Museum, Anadarko, OK.

The Lawrence Percolator is the project space of the Lawrence Corporation for the Advancement of the Visual Arts. LCAVA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing new art and cultural events to audiences in Lawrence and Douglas County Kansas. The Percolator is a community-based exhibition and performance space accessible to all members of the community. The Percolator is located at 913 Rhode Island, in the alley north of the Lawrence Arts Center (south of East Ninth Street, between New Hampshire and Rhode Island). Look for the green awnings. The gallery space is open Saturdays and Sundays from 12-5 pm.

PHOENIX GALLERY (825 Massachusetts St.)
http://phoenixgalleryart.com

This month’s Final Friday festivities at the Phoenix Gallery will include artist Dave Van Hee, artwork from the Lawrence Art Walk artists, music by Sean Mawhirter and food from Wheatfield’s Bakery.

It is always an exciting night when Dave Van Hee is in the Phoenix Gallery!! Here are his thoughts on the evening……

Agridelic! Don’t miss what got made recently in a shack out on East 15th Street. One night only. Agridelic antique tractor paintings. . .superstition on big rubber! Food by Wheatfields Bakery. One and only drawings and watercolors pinned to the wall! Also see paintings with paint as thick as zombies on a tiny screen! Say it again: food by Wheatfields Bakery. Don’t let the flying monkeys dressed as bell boys keep you away! Leave home! Join the rodeo before somebody outlaws handmade once and for all! All pervading good vibe masks for sale, Fill the house with mask joy peace!

From 5-9 PM this Final Friday, select works from each artist that will be participating in next month’s Lawrence Art Walk will be featured throughout both the Phoenix Gallery and the Phoenix Underground.

Soothing classical and South American instrumentals can be heard by Sean Mawhirter.
It is time again for the return of Breads and Spreads from Wheatfields Bakery. Their wonderful homemade spreads that accompany fresh baked breads are always a Lawrence favorite!

PHOENIX UNDERGROUND (825 Massachusetts St.)
http://phoenixgalleryart.com

This month for Final Friday, Phoenix Underground will be featuring selected artwork from artists participating in the Lawrence ArtWalk 20th Anniversary showing in October. For this exhibition, the Lawrence ArtWalk is excited to highlight Jane Flanders’ artwork, as she will be the featured artist. Artwork will be displayed throughout both the Phoenix Gallery and the Phoenix Underground. Join us in celebration Friday, September 25, 2015 from 5-9 pm for the opening reception. The exhibition will be on display through October 28, 2015.

TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES (835 Massachusetts St.)
http://facebook.com/tenthousandvillageslawrence

Toni Brou (“Brew”) grew up in Dodge City, KS. She learned to love the creative process while watching her father tinker at his work bench, making what he modestly called “junk art” from found objects. Toni went on to earn a BFA in Graphic Design/Illustration at KU. When a series of personal tragedies struck, Toni adopted the mantra “the sun always rises” and her current tongue-in-cheek fine folk art style. Toni’s smiling hubcap sun assemblages are broadcast on CBS Sunday Morning on a regular basis as the show fades to commercial. The artist lives in Lawrence with her Three Most Important Pieces of Work–her three tall sons. Memories of them as little boys are the inspiration for the sense of whimsy so evident in Toni’s pieces. Her work has been sold in galleries around the U.S. and is in private collections in many countries around the world. Toni will have original wall art as well as always affordable cards, prints and ornaments at this show.

THE BOURGEOIS PIG (6 E. 9th St.) 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
http://www.facebook.com/TheBourgeoisPig

Leslie Kuluva is an artist and printmaker living and working in East Lawrence. A graduate of the University of Kansas, she has studied many areas of art, and has been booking bands locally for over a decade as well. She is also the creator of the now beloved expression, “LFK”. Leslie owns and operates LFK Press, a print and design studio in East Lawrence, serving the local community and beyond.

Artist Statement: I enjoy working in various media, but when I found printmaking years ago, it quickly captured my attention. It inspired me with endless possibility, and it’s balance of planning and process, mathematics and art.

I revel in the ability to create work that is handmade, while being reproduceable, and that it has the potential to reach more people as a result. Not only can printmaking yield multiple works, lending itself to more accessible price tags than single pieces, but the printing process is a profound and integral part the journey. The changes that occur through printmaking, between the original image and the final result, can transform a drawing beyond the imagination, and could most certainly never be simulated. I love to think of it as an outside force, a collaborator, another hand at work. Some things are gained in translation.

My work is a balance of detail and suggestion, a blend of line, texture, levity, and the quest to cherish moments. I hope to bring a bit of buoyancy and sentiment to others through small statements.

This series is a look at some things I treasure about Lawrence.

WATKINS MUSEUM (1047 Massachusetts Street) 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
http://www.watkinsmuseum.org/

The Watkins Museum of History will host a free Final Friday event on September 25, 2015, from 5 to 8 p.m., introducing a new exhibition titled Under Protest: Emigrant Tribes in Franklin County, Kansas. This exhibition relates the stories of eleven tribes—where they came from, how they arrived in Franklin County, and their fates after relocation to Kansas. Developed in partnership with the Franklin County Historical Society, the exhibition includes historic photographs, maps, and artifacts drawn from the collections of both the Douglas County and Franklin Count Historical Societies. The exhibition will run from September 25, 2015 through January 9, 2016.

In the 1830s and ‘40s many tribes were relocated to land in what are now the states of Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma. Tribes native to Kansas were restricted to land on defined reservations. During the Civil War, pro-Union tribes escaping from Confederate forces in Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) often sought refuge in Kansas. “As a result,” DCHS Executive Director, Steve Nowak indicated, “the area that is now Franklin County became home to a greater diversity of Emigrant Tribes than any other place in Kansas. The history and fate of those tribes reflects that of tribes relocated to reservations that were spread across what would become the state of Kansas.”

The exhibition’s opening will be celebrated with a talk by Prof. Eric Anderson of Haskell Indian Nations University, as well as Native foods, music, and dancing by Haskell students. Fittingly, this year September 25 is also Native American Day. Join us for an exciting evening of Indian history and culture marking our new exhibition and a unique partnership of three local institutions.

ECCENTRICITY (716 Massachusetts St)

Artist and Poet Karl Dean:

As an artist and a writer, I strive for balance. It is essential not only in the aesthetics, but in life itself. As a poet foremost, I elect to intertwine color and emotion with my words. To bring those elements together in a certain symmetry allows the viewer to observe with an appreciation at any angle, which affords a more powerful and spoken piece. To reach the viewer’s emotions is of importance to me. Knowing I conveyed a message and touched someone’s heart in an uplifting manner is of the utmost fulfillment; so what better perspective than balance…

FINAL FRIDAY EVENTS IN THE WAREHOUSE ARTS DISTRICT

CIDER GALLERY (810 Pennsylvania St.)
www.cidergallery.com

Opening reception: Final Fridays, September 25th, 5:00-9:00pm

Wayne Propst : Recent Sledge Hammer Paintings

“Sledge hammer painting is or appears to be random and chaotic. It is actually quite directed by several tools that I have evolved. But it is sledge hammer painting thus head speed remains the most impacting component of this work. Really it’s about energy. Industrial coatings at 400 feet per second.” WP

*Show runs through October*

SEEDCO STUDIOS (720 E 9th St.)
www.seedcostudios.com

  • Lori Anderson
  • Barrie Arachtingi
  • Jesse Gray
  • Erok Johanssen
  • Kate Larson
  • Brandon Mateer
  • Landon Merrill
  • Jeromy Morris
  • Dani Ramirez
  • Janice Raiteri
  • Catherine Reed
  • Jeremy Rockwell
  • Elizabeth Rowley
  • John Sebelius
  • Karl Soukup
  • Ryan Storck
  • Kyla Strid
  • Aaron Youngstrom
  • Lesa Weller
  • Dana Wiseman
  • Felt Show
  • Whatever Forever

Located within the Warehouse Arts District at 720 E 9th Street #7 in Lawrence, KS, this space is ideal for making, showing and engaging in all aspects of art. With 18 artist studios, a music recording operation and collaborative space/gallery, the potential for creating at all scales is practically limitless. SeedCo is envisioned as a creative factory/laboratory with each of the resident artists bringing their singular artistic identity and prowess to expand and delve deeper into conception and production. At the heart of this project is a conscious intent to transform post-industrial space into a fluent medium all its own, specifically designed to transcend temporal and spatial values and condense them to create a heightened sensory experience. A multi-disciplinary approach emphasizing cooperation, collaboration, and community involvement and encompassing elements from fine art, sculpture, graphic design and production, music and recording, fashion, construction, digital med ia, and street art, the scope of this endeavor is far-reaching, but the flavor is distinctly home-grown. With its placement in the center of historic redevelopment, SeedCo Studios has the chance to act as a catalyst for creative growth, not only in Lawrence proper, but radiating outward into the surrounding regional area and beyond.

FINAL FRIDAY EVENTS IN NORTH LAWRENCE

THE BREWHAUS (624 N. 2nd Street) 6:00-9:00 p.m.

In Search of Imagination – A Wonderful Caricature of Intimacy by Valkyrie Schmidt

Artist Statement: I started drawing with pencil and paper when I was 4, and I remember thinking how much easier it was to draw in black and white; because expressing the colors I saw in the images in my head were so difficult. Now I have grown into the vibrant and bold colors I use when I paint, because these colors shock the system and they themselves evoke emotions on their own and with the imagery itself.

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